Harrison Broer's blog

Are You Walking Enough?

Modern life seems to be characterized by sedimentary humans. Because of technological advances and how humankind has evolved, most people no longer have to spend all day plowing the fields, walking distances to work, or do any strenuous physical activity as part of their daily routine. While this may mean people have to exert less energy to produce more, being sedentary for long periods can cause health complications.

Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

According to the National Kidney Foundation, every year, more than half a million Americans go to the emergency for kidney stone problems [1]. Also, kidney stone prevalence has been increasing, rising from 3.8% in the late 1970s to 8.8% in the late 2000s, with men and women having a current risk of 19% and 9%, respectively [1].

Additional Benefits of Vitamin C, Memory Support, Iron Absorption, Gout Prevention, Immune Function

Recently, I posted an article investigating vitamin C and its scientific association between chronic health and cardiovascular disease, so before reading this article, you can access that one by clicking here. I recommend reading that article before this one in that article we present some declarative facts about vitamin C as well as discuss its antioxidant properties.

Harvard: The Western Diet Devastates Sperm Count

A brand-new, 2019 study that was posted by Harvard’s School of Public Health, Environmental Health, and Nutrition Departments offers a troubling perspective on the health of today’s youth. Although it may seem like a pedestrian concept, diet affects one’s health, and researchers investigated to what extent diet affects sperm count in men [1].

Lifestyle Influences Body Mass Index, Not Genes

Genetics seems to be a casual scapegoat for poor health and illnesses. It is a generally recognized truth that hereditary factors influence one’s chance of developing heart disease, cancer, stroke, or obesity. However, a recent study published in the Public Library of Science Genetics begs to differ. The 2017 study investigated the influence of genetics and lifestyle on individuals’ body mass index (BMI) [1].

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